The Water Lily Way

A school counselor's story of how to live, work and play…the water lily way


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Bucket Filling!

I’m LOVING this book: How Full is Your Bucket? Kids REALLY seem to connect with the content and the¬†meaning behind the story. The real test, as we know, will be to see if they can apply it when they’re interacting with their peers, teachers, and families… TBD! ūüėČ

buckeft filli

I have been using this book when working individually with¬†kiddo’s, although you could totally use this for a small groups or for an entire¬†class when teaching a lesson. We’ve had requests from teachers to work with numerous girls on friendship skills. How Full is Your Bucket has been a great way to connect with these girls and cover friendship skills such as¬†facial expressions, tone of voice, eye contact, expression of feelings,¬†inclusion, etc. It typically has been taking me one session just to read the book and talk about it briefly with the student. I usually take turns reading the book with the student (dependent upon age), and conversation evolves as we make our way through. Some of the topics/questions we talk about throughout the story include:

-Who was a bucket dipper? Why?

-How do the character’s feel when their bucket is dipped into? When their bucket is empty?

-Has your bucket ever been dipped into? Emptied? When? How did you feel?

-Who was a bucket filler? Why?

-How can we fill others buckets? How can we fill our own buckets?

-How do we feel when our buckets are full? How did the character’s in the story feel what their buckets were full?

-What can we do at school to be bucker fillers? In the classroom? At recess? At home?

 

When we meet again for¬†a second time, we review what we learned about being bucket dippers and bucket fillers by writing different examples out on a¬†dry erase board or sheet of paper. After, we each create some piece of small artwork, letter, etc. for another person in hopes to fill their bucket! When I meet with the student for the third time, we once again review bucket dipping and filling, and talk about how it felt to fill someone else’s bucket. Here are some other GREAT options of ways to incorporate “bucket filling” when working individually with kiddos, in small groups or in a classroom!

 

Bucket Filling Poem: http://www.pinterest.com/jendemfit/school-bucket-filler-activities/

Bucket Filler Worksheet http://www.hopkinshoppinhappenings.com/2012/10/bucket-filling-freebie.html

Lessons/Ideas from Scholastic http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2010/04/are-your-students-bucket-fillers

Bucket Filling Journal (From http://www.bucketfillers101.com)

Bucket Filling Paper Bucket

Bucket Filling Coloring Sheet

Bucket Filling Form (From http://www.bainbridgeclass.com/files.htm)

Bucket Filling Sign

How Full is Your Bucket? On You-Tube: https://www.youtube.com/watch/?v=A5R6-2m_qHk

There are tons of other activities and lessons out there -pinterest has lots of great ideas from other educators and parents.

 

Have fun spreading the bucket filling cheer! ūüôā

-Jessica

 

 

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Online, FREE Resources to use with Students: Books, Songs, Movement Activities and More

Hi Friends!

As an aspiring counselor, I am beginning to gather different resources such as books, games, toys, etc. However, as we all know there’s a ton of resources, activities and books online that are FREE to use. What a great way to balance and mix up resources as an educator. Like many of the other collections I’ve shared on the blog, this is a very¬† basic list! I will continue to add to this list as I slowly uncover more of the wonderful and inexpensive resources that exist for educators! Enjoy and feel free to share others that you’ve found to be fun and effective to use throughout the school day!

Books

Energizers & Movement for Students with the Wiggles

Relaxation, Deep Breathing, Mindfulness

Music Videos

Clips with Powerful Messages

 Brain Breaks

  • Gonoodle.com –This site is AWESOME! If you’ve never heard of it, check it out asap! Zumba for kids, calming exercises, energizing exercises…So great for the classroom! You have to create an account (you earn points as you do different exercises), but it’s FREE! ūüôā


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Lesson Plans for School Counseling Core Curriculum

An important aspect to delivering a comprehensive school counseling program¬†entails¬†providing students with lessons or activities that are preventative and developmental in design. School Counseling Core Curriculum is often thought of as “guidance,” however curriculum can actually be delivered to students in a school through several strategies such as:

Direct Instruction:

School Counselor’s teach¬†school counseling core curriculum in a variety of subject areas to all students in classrooms, school counselor offices, computer labs and other school facilities. School¬†Counseling Core Curriculum is focused around the three domains: academic development, career development and personal/social development.¬†¬†The ASCA model encourages school counselors to allocate 35%-45% of their total time spent at school providing students with school counseling curriculum. Not only does direct instruction provide students with knowledge, skills and new awareness’s, but it also assists the school counselor in identifying students who may need further support in either¬†a small group setting¬†or¬†through¬†individual student counseling.

Groups Activities:

The school counselor facilitates groups outside of the classroom to meet individual student needs or interests. The groups promote academic, career or personal/social development to enhance student skills and knowledge within these areas.

 

Examples of possible content topics for direct instruction or group activities:

Academic support

Career awareness

Career exploration

Character education

Conflict resolution

Cultural competence

Goal setting

Mindfulness

Protective behaviors

Relational skills

School safety

Self-management

Social skills

Stress management and healthy coping

Transitions

Wellness

 

The following are lesson plans that could be used to deliver school counseling curriculum to students. The lesson plans have been created using the current templates provided by ASCA for school counselors.

Personal/Social Lesson #1

Career Lesson Plan #1

Academic Lesson Plan #1


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“Bee Breathing” -A Deep Breathing Exercise for Kids

Hi Friends!

I hope your week is off to a great start. Just wanted to share a fun resource with you that I was able to try out with some kiddos at my practicum site today. Before I say much more, if you haven’t tried deep breathing or relaxation exercises with your children or students, don’t let¬†any nervousness you may have to do so hold you back! All of the kids I have tried deep breathing with respond SO well to¬†it. It amazes me! Maybe it has something to do with¬†how fast paced our society is, especially our schools!¬†There are so many responsibilities and expectations in our classrooms today, there often is not time for just “being¬†& breathing.”

Anyways,¬†my cool tool for you! If you check out the website, “www.kidsrelaxation.com” a screen should pop up offering a free subscription for a chapter from the book “Deep Breathing for Kids.” I have not looked into this book yet, however I plan to do so! The free chapter will be sent to you via email, and it has some great breathing exercises for kids. For instance, one activity is “bee breathing.” In this activity children (or a child if you do this individually as I did) practices inhaling and exhaling. During the exhale you encourage the children to make a “buzzzz” sound as they breathe out. I have the Bee Breathing activity listed below, but definietely check out the website for more¬† mindfulness¬†fun with children! Have a great week! ūüôā ūüôā ūüôā

 

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Bee Breathing

1) Let’s get in a comfortable position to practice bee breathing. Imagine that you are sitting on a leaf or a flower petal. Sit straight and allow the leaf petal to support you.

2) Breath in, allowing the air to just gently come in through your nose, filling up your lungs.

3) As you breathe out, buzz like a bee. see how far your bee is going to fly before sitting down and resting again. Buzz. Buzz. Buzz

4) On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a loud, strong buzz.

5) On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a soft buzz.

6) Does it feel different with a strong or soft buzz? How does your buzz feel?

Ideas for use: After breathing practice, draw a picture of a bumblebee and the leaf or flower that you were “sitting” on in your imagination. This picture can be used as a relaxation practice reminder. When you see the picture, practice being like a bee and practice bee breath!